[Review] The Princess Bride by William Goldman

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What happens when the most beautiful girl in the world marries the handsomest prince of all time and he turns out to be…well…a lot less than the man of her dreams?

As a boy, William Goldman claims, he loved to hear his father read the S. Morgenstern classic, The Princess Bride. But as a grown-up he discovered that the boring parts were left out of good old Dad’s recitation, and only the “good parts” reached his ears.

Now Goldman does Dad one better. He’s reconstructed the “Good Parts Version” to delight wise kids and wide-eyed grownups everywhere.

What’s it about? Fencing. Fighting. True Love. Strong Hate. Harsh Revenge. A Few Giants. Lots of Bad Men. Lots of Good Men. Five or Six Beautiful Women. Beasties Monstrous and Gentle. Some Swell Escapes and Captures. Death, Lies, Truth, Miracles, and a Little Sex.

In short, it’s about everything.

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3stars

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That was one weird book. At first I thought about not rating it at all because I was so confused but I decided against it after some thinking. 3 out of 5 because I loved the story but not the fact that there was narration.

What’s it about? Fencing. Fighting. True Love. Strong Hate. Harsh Revenge. A Few Giants. Lots of Bad Men. Lots of Good Men. Five or Six Beautiful Women. Beasties Monstrous and Gentle. Some Swell Escapes and Captures. Death, Lies, Truth, Miracles, and a Little Sex.

Right after I started reading I was kind of lost. Willian Goldman was always several steps ahead of me. I mean I was trying to follow his thoughts and I just couldn’t catch up with him. He was young and then out of nowhere he was alreadya grown up author and then he was back being a child and then adult again. Too confusing for me to focus. Plus I never understood why he was part of the story. I guess it’s because he was trying to succeed in using sarcasm and satire. Anyway I decided to ignore him but everytime he was interrupting the story to add something that wasn’t making any sense or was completely useless to the story, he was getting on my poor nerves. I was so fighting with myself to just abandon the book but the story was good and I had to finish it. After a while the story got even better and his interruptions were less. I have to add here that after watching the movie I appreciated some of the stuff I considered unnecessary.

I loved the story so much and I loved the way William Goldman put it even though it was fast and sometimes tiring. But I laughed a lot with his satire and with all the emphasized points that there are in prctically all stories and fairytales. I don’t question why people suggest this book anymore but it’s not a book that all people can handle. So the characters were lovely; Inigo and Fezzik were hilarious, Buttercap was a bitch sometimes but I liked that she was also not the usual pretty brainless girl and Westely was kind of sexist but he was also brave and loyal to his love. I also found William Goldman sexist but I can’t say for sure. Maybe it was because of the era that the story was set, maybe not.

What I couldn’t stand were the “sound effects” like “ZZZ”, “CRACK”, “ARGHHH” or “SPLAT”. Ι felt so stupid and it made me think that apparently the author doesn’t know how to describe differently the noises. It was like I was reading a comic book and obviously I didn’t want to read one. Last but not least come all bruckets. I hated the bruckets because the weren’t needed in the story and because brucket gave him the chance to just say nonsense.

Finally, I made it till the end and somehow I don’t regret reading it. I actually suggest you to read it because like I said at the beginning, this is one weird book that you should definitelly read before you die!
Bye!

abouttheauthor

[William Goldman]

Goldman grew up in a Jewish family in Highland Park, Illinois, a Chicago suburb, and obtained a BA degree at Oberlin College in 1952 and an MA degree at Columbia University in 1956.His brother was the late James Goldman, author and playwright.

William Goldman had published five novels and had three plays produced on Broadway before he began to write screenplays. Several of his novels he later used as the foundation for his screenplays. In the 1980s he wrote a series of memoirs looking at his professional life on Broadway and in Hollywood (in one of these he famously remarked that “Nobody knows anything”). He then returned to writing novels. He then adapted his novel The Princess Bride to the screen, which marked his re-entry into screenwriting.
Goldman has won two Academy Awards: an Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and an Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay for All the President’s Men. He has also won two Edgar Awards, from the Mystery Writers of America, for Best Motion Picture Screenplay: forHarper in 1967, and for Magic (adapted from his own 1976 novel) in 1979.

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